Minnesota Grey Ducks

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Minnesota Grey Ducks
Current season
Established 2018
First season: 2018
Play in and headquartered in The Nest
Duluth, Minnesota
Minnesota Grey Ducks logo
Logo
League/conference affiliations

DSFL (2018–present)

Current uniform
Team colorsDark Grey, Blue, Light Grey
              
Personnel
Team history
  • Minnesota Grey Ducks (2018–present)
Championships
League championships (0)
Conference championships (7)
Division championships (6)
Playoff appearances (16)
Home fields

The Minnesota Grey Ducks (formerly the San Antonio Marshals (2018-2033)) are a professional American football franchise based in Duluth, Minnesota. The Grey Ducks currently compete in the Developmental Simulation Football League (DSFL) as a member club of the league's Northern Conference (DSFL North) which currently only has one division. The franchise was established in 2018 as one of the original DSFL teams, before relocating ahead of the 2034 season, retaining their history as the Marshals. The Grey Ducks have won the Ultimini five times – in 2018, 2021, 2034, 2035 and 2044

History of the Minnesota Grey Ducks

Season 1

The San Antonio Marshals franchise was established in the year 2018, the DSFL's inaugural season, by kckolbe, a highly controversial but nonetheless prominent figure in the ISFL. They came out to a hot start in their first-ever season as a professional franchise, led by their star rookie Quarterback Jameis Christ, star Running back John Goose, hard-hitting rookie Linebackers Barrick Acolyte and Brian Kelly, and their ball-hawking Cornerback Isaiah Rashad, the Marshals were able to finish the regular season with 9 wins and 5 losses (5-2 at home) and with a comfortable berth in the playoffs and home-field advantage. In their first matchup of the 2016, the Marshals faced the Kansas City Coyotes, a team that had amassed a 7-7 record in the regular season. The Coyotes came out to an early lead in the first quarter, with Patrick Greene nailing a 43-yard field goal to make the score 0-3, shutting out the Marshals for the rest of the quarter. This would be their best defensive performance of the game. Jameis Christ came out firing early into the second, throwing a touchdown pass to Sean Strong, with John Goose scoring on a touchdown later into the quarter, making the score 14-3 by the end of the second quarter. Going into the second half, the Coyotes knew that they were losing badly, and needed a quick score to narrow the gap. Patrick Greene nailed another 40+ yard field-goal to shorten the Marshal's lead to one score, which they quickly responded to, with Christ throwing a touchdown pass to Joseph Tkachuk to extend the lead to two scores once more, at 28-6. The Coyotes quickly retaliated with a field goal, but this was the last time they'd score in this game. The Marshals finished off the Coyotes with another rushing touchdown from Goose, capped off with a pick-6 from Rashad (despite a missed extra-point from Jimmy Darkapple) and left the stadium with a 41-9 win, and a shot at being the inaugural champions of the DSFL, the first team ever to win the Ultimini. They were able to accomplish exactly this in the next game, nearly shutting out the opposition (with the exception of a 47-yard field-goal by their kicker, Jason Jerek) and putting up 19 points off of a stellar kicking performance by Darkapple, and with the addition of a 1-yard rushing touchdown by Goose, they became the first-ever DSFL Ultimini Champions. At the conclusion of the season, the Marshals dominated and nearly swept the awards ceremony, with John Goose being named the League MVP, Offensive MVP, and Playoff MVP, while Barrick Acolyte took home the Defensive MVP award, capping off a magnificent and historical season of football by the San Antonio Marshals.

Season 2

In their second season as a professional franchise, the San Antonio Marshals got off to a rocky start, jumping to 4-3 by mid-season. They hoped to right the boat and turn their record around by Week 8 in order to hopefully build enough momentum for a hot start to the playoffs, but despite the efforts of star Quarterback Vincent Draxel, a star Running back duo in Jack Stats and Thomas Mango, star Linebackers Ben Urlacher, and Brian Acolyte, and star Defensive end Bastion Barnhardt, the Marshals would finish the regular season with 7 wins and 7 losses, with a .500 win percentage and a 4-3 record at home. Despite this, they were still able to secure a berth in the playoffs, matching up against the 7-7 Tijuana Luchadores. This game turned out to be a battle for both sides, with the Marshals coming in with an early lead off of a Thomas Mango touchdown run. The Luchadores quickly answered with a touchdown pass from Quarterback Isaac Brown to WR Jordan Smith near the end of the first quarter. The Marshals began the second quarter with another touchdown run, this time by Jack Stats, and a few minutes later added onto their lead with a touchdown carry by backup Running back Warin Parry. The Luchadores, now being down 2 scores going into the 3rd quarter, attempted to come back from this deficit, but the Marshals defense held fast and put up the stops to shut them down going into the 4th. Early on into the 4th, Placekicker Jimmy Darkapple nailed a 41-yard field goal to propel the Marshals lead to 24-7, which is where it would remain for the rest of the game. The Marshals advanced to the Ultimini, where they would be defeated by the 11-3 Portland Pythons, ending their hopes at back-to-back Ultimini wins. They would not dominate the awards ceremony as they had a season prior, with only Jack Stats being nominated for League MVP and Offensive Rookie of the Year, neither of which he ended up winning, ending a heartbreaking campaign for the Marshals.

Season 3

In their third season as a professional franchise, the San Antonio Marshals got off to a hot start, jumping to 4-0 by Week 4, but crashed and burned shortly afterward, with 3 straight losses to bring them to 4-3 by mid-season. Vincent Draxel and Jack Stats had both been demoted to a backup role for this season, despite their electrifying performances merely a season ago. Despite having the best-ranked offensive-line in the league during this season, rookie QB Christian Adams and starting RB Willy Nyquist could not get the offense moving, as the Marshals dropped to the 2nd-worst ranked passing offense in the league, and despite being ranked as the third-best rushing offense in the league, Nyquist only rushed for 811 yards, far flat of the 1000 yard threshold. The defense did not help much either, and despite being the 2nd-best punting team, the defense did nothing to get the offense in good field position, ending the season ranked just below the mid-line at 3rd-worst in the league. The Marshals would only win 2 more times that season, ending the season at 6 wins and 8 losses, with a .429 win percentage and a 3-4 record at home. They would miss the playoffs entirely, tied with the 2nd-worst record in the league, and the worst in their conference. Not a single Marshals player was nominated for an award.

Season 4

In their fourth season as a professional franchise, the Marshals came in determined to impress. Despite the fact that they lost all 4 of their pre-season games, under the lead of star rookie Quarterback Mike Vick, star WR Footballer Catcherman, and starting RB Willy Nyquist, the Marshals were able to accrue a 5-2 record by mid-season. After mid-season, however, their defense would give out despite a resurgent season from star CB Isaiah Rashad. They would only win 2 more games, tying 1 and losing the other 3. Regardless, they still made the playoffs with a 7 win, 6 loss, and 1 tie record, the best in their conference. In the first game of the playoffs, the Marshals would face the 5-9 Tijuana Luchadores. The game was a complete and utter blowout, with the Marshals scoring at least a touchdown in every quarter. Mike Vick, the Marshals starting QB threw touchdown passes to Footballer Catcherman and Jake Gore, with Jimmy Darkapple adding extra points to the Marshals total. Later on in the game, Vick was replaced by his backup, Ryan Applehort, who threw 2 more touchdown passes, one being to Footballer Catcherman, and another to Warren Droege. Backup RB for the Marshals, Carter Bush had a 106 yard game, filling in for Nyquist due to an underwhelming performance on his part. The only scores the Luchadores would register were a pick-6 from Brian Mills 2 off a Vick pass, a safety on Vick, and a field-goal from their kicker, Brandon Walsh. Following this excellent performance, the Marshals moved on, hoping to secure the Ultimini in their next game. They were matched up against the Kansas City Coyotes in the championship game. The Coyotes scored early with a touchdown run from RB Robby Rainey, and an extra point from Beat Meoff. The Marshals countered this with a field-goal from Jimmy Darkapple, but were not able to score for the remainder of the quarter. Going into the second quarter, the Coyotes scored once more with a Mark Strike 40-yard pass to Howard Miller, but with a missed extra point from Beat Meoff. This was all it took for the Marshals to get their wake-up call. For the remainder of the game, the Marshals would put on a clinic. Willy Nyquist had an 80-yard touchdown run, QB Mike Vick had a touchdown run, and Darkapple would kick two field-goals, and along with a stellar defensive performance, the Marshals would win the Ultimini once again, 23-13. Vick would go on to win the Playoffs MVP award, while Nyquist would win Offensive Rookie of the Year, capping off an amazing season of play from the San Antonio Marshals.

Season 5

In their fifth season as a professional franchise, the Marshals severely underachieved. They were 2-5 by mid-season, despite a decent 2-2 pre-season, and struggled to put out a strong defense on the field, even with the support of Mike Vick, who had broken most of the Marshals passing records by mid-season. Even though the passing aspect of their offense only seemed to improve as time passed, the Marshals were lackluster in the run, and their defense was horrid, having allowed at least 13 points in all but two occasions, both being close wins. Despite a terrible regular season, having concluded their run with a 5 win and 9 loss record, the Marshals were still able to surprisingly sneak into the playoffs, in part due to an equally bad season by the Palm Beach Solar Bears, who went 4-10. In their first and only playoff game of the season, the Marshals were on the receiving end of a 22-10 blowout at the hands of the 6-8 Tijuana Luchadores, another team that severely underperformed and still made the playoffs. Despite this terrible season, Vick would be considered for MVP and OPOY, but sadly did not win either award, capping off an underwhelming season of play from the San Antonio Marshals.

Season 6

In their sixth season as a professional franchise, the Marshals came in determined to impress. Despite the fact that they lost all 4 of their pre-season games, under the lead of star rookie Quarterback Kevin Fitzpatrick, who would set the franchise passing yards record for the Marshals in this very season, a record which still stands today. Aiding Fitzpatrick on offense was star rookie RB Marquise Brown, who would set both the franchise rushing yards and touchdowns records for the Marshals. Veteran WR Footballer Catcherman would go on to break the Marshals franchise receiving yards record this season, dominating secondaries for the entire season. The Marshals were able to accrue a 4-3 record by mid-season, showing promise for the rest of the season. After mid-season, however, their defense would finally step-up, with LB Jesse Marchand and veteran DE Brock Weathers III taking charge and helping the Marshals go undefeated after mid-season. The Marshals would make the playoffs with an 11 win and 3 loss record, going in as clear favorites to win the Ultimini. In the first round, they faced the 8-6 Tijuana Luchadores. Early in the first quarter, on the first play of the game, Fitzpatrick threw an interception to Luchadores Free Safety Thad Pennington, who returned it 35 yards for a touchdown, and with a successful extra point try the Luchadores were up 7-0. Shortly afterwards, Fitzpatrick would throw a 22-yard touchdown to Catcherman, and with a successful extra point, the teams were tied at 7-7. The game would remain fairly even and defensively-oriented for the next two quarters, with Fitzpatrick throwing an interception to Dean Vranos early in the third quarter. The Marshals were able to score twice more with 34 and 42 yard field goals from their kicker, Emilio Ramero. They would hold the lead at 13-7 until the late fourth quarter, and despite an interception thrown by the Luchadores to Marshals FS Nate Piazza, the Luchadores were able to successfully complete a late-game drive to take the lead, with a 16-yard touchdown run from Sydney Spinelli, making the score 14-13, and ending the Marshals season in heartbreak. Despite Brown's 145-yard rushing effort, the Marshals just could not stop the Luchadores in crunch time, which ended up costing them a shot at a third Ultimini. The Luchadores would go on to upset the 10-4 Kansas City Coyotes in the Ultimini game, winning 21-20. No Marshals player was able to win a league award during this season, which was a disappointing end to an amazing, but heartbreaking, season of play from the San Antonio Marshals.

Season 7

In their seventh season as a professional franchise, the Marshals were very mediocre, despite their record from the previous season. They had lost most of their quality starters to the NSFL, and despite a franchise record-setting season from QB Mike Vick, they did not amount to much, limping through the pre-season at 2-2, and amassing a 2-5 record by midseason. Brock Weathers III would go on to have another great defensive season, as expected, but the only player nominated for an award that season was Vick, and for good reason, throwing for 2,212 yards despite an aging receiving corps. Somehow, even with this horrendous record, the Marshals made the playoffs, but were boatraced out by the Tijuana Luchadores in the first round (which was a common theme at this point in Marshals' history), suffering a gruesome 22-10 defeat at their hands (the score being inflated by a garbage time rushing touchdown by the Marshals). This was, yet again, a very disappointing season from the Marshals, especially given their early history and reputation.

Season 8

In their eighth season as a professional franchise, the Marshals were coming off two back-to-back losing seasons, and were obviously looking to impress. They did exactly that, sweeping all of their pre-season games, and reaching midseason with a 4-3 record. Their star-studded roster, headlined by names such as speedy Quarterback Mike Vick, crafty veteran WR Footballer Catcherman, upstart rookie RB Marquise Brown, a powerful, sack-hunting front-7 duo of Brock Weathers III and Ben Urlacher, and aided by their ball-hawking secondary comprised of Bucky Barnes, Oskar Ludvig, and Egan Winter, it's no surprise that this stacked Marshals team absolutely dominated the second half of the season, winning all 7 of their last 7 games of the season. Expectations were as high as they ever were in preparation for the playoffs, but sadly, the Marshals could not deliver this time. They once again fell to the Luchadores in the first round, with their loss coming off of a touchdown run scored by the Luchadores in the last 2 minutes of the game. On their next drive, they failed to complete a pass on 4th-and-1, and with that, their season was over. A true heartbreaker. Many of the Marshals were nominated for awards that season, but none of them were able to secure a single one. A disappointing end to a fantastic regular season and mediocre playoff run.

Season 9

After a disappointing playoff appearance, the San Antonio Marshals Opened up the 2024 season with a week one tie in Palm Beach against the Solar Bears, with both teams scoring 23 points. The Marshals got off to a slow start, failing to win a game until week 4 which would start a 4 game win streak to put them at 2nd place in the division behind the 6-1 Tijuana Luchadores. Thanks to a defense which held opponents to less than 20 points per game and an offense led by names such as rookie quarterback Zenyou Wozy, who threw the ball for almost 2400 yards and 9 touchdowns, running back Marquise Brown, who ran for 1665 yards and 13 touchdowns, and lead wide receiver Blake Marchand who caught the ball 55 times for 648 yards and 3 touchdowns, the Marshals were able to finish the season with a record of 8 wins and 5 losses and earn themselves another playoff appearance and another shot at the Ultimini title. In the SFC conference championship, San Antonio went up against the Tijuana Luchadores for the second season in a row and again would lose, struggling to find the end zone, with a final score of 24-19.

Season 10

After another failure in the playoffs thanks to the Tijuana Luchadores, the Marshals were looking to make it back to the playoffs, but this time, make a deeper run than in season nine. The Marshals got off to a hot start, winning their first three games including their opener vs the very team that knocked them out of the playoffs in the previous season, the Luchadores. The game was an excellent comeback win thanks to 2 4th quarter touchdowns, including a late pick-six and 2 point conversion to put them in the lead by a field goal. Thanks to the league's best defense, a stingy group that gave up less than 15.9 points per game, and the league's best passing offense led by quarterback Zenyou Wozy, San Antonio was able to make it to the playoffs yet again, finishing second in the conference behind the Tijuana Luchadores with a 9-5 record, setting them up for another SFC South conference championship game south of the border in Mexico. The San Antonio Marshals went into the game hopeful and looking to make an appearance in the Ultimini, but they cam out of the game absolutely deflated, defeated, and demoralized, getting crushed in a 34-3 beatdown. The Marshals were unable to score a single touchdown in the game and lost to the Luchadores in the conference championship round for the fourth season in a row.

Season 11

The Marshals' loss to the Tijuana Luchadores in the SFC South conference championship lit a fire under them, and San Antonio was determined to do better in the 11th season of the Developmental Simulation Football League. Led by returning quarterback Zenyou Wozy, who threw for more than 2900 yards and 16 touchdowns, the high scoring Marshals offense outscored their league rivals by over 100 points on the season. This amazing offense paired with the league's second-best defense, which gave up just 18.6 points per game allowed the Marshals to soar to the top of their division, finishing the season atop the SFC South conference with a record of 9 wins and 5 losses, four wins more than the second-place Luchadores who had just 5 wins on the season. San Antonio was finally getting a home playoff game, this time playing a Tijuana team who's season up to that point had been lackluster, only making the playoffs because the third team in the division, the Palm Beach Solar Bears, managed to do worse, winning only 4 games. In this playoff game which finally favored the Marshals, Tijuana managed to swipe the victory away, coming back from a 14-0 first-quarter deficit, sending the Marshals packing for the fifth consecutive season.

Season 12

The season 12 Marshals were distraught after losing yet another conference championship game to the Luchadores, and although they won their week one matchup vs a strong Kansas City Coyotes team, they would get off to a terrible start, with a record of 1-4 in their first five games. Despite having the league's best passing offense with quarterback Zenyou Wozy at the helm, the Marshals had a terrible defense, allowing opponents to score more than 22 points per game and rack up over 340 yards per game. Luckily, San Antonio was able to get back to the playoffs thanks to a Solar Bears team that was still struggling to figure out which side of the football you're supposed to throw. With just a 5-9 record, the Marshals were off to Tijuana to face them in another SFC South conference championship game. This time around, the Marshals managed to beat their rivals and make it to the Ultimini game, thanks to a great defense that kept the Luchadores from scoring after the first quarter in a low-scoring, 13-7 game. The Marshals could have used some of this defense in the Ultimini game vs the Kansas City Coyotes, because it seemed like the Coyotes were unstoppable, scoring 37 points on the Marshals and flying around the field for 417 yards. In a crushing Ultimini defeat, San Antonio went home empty-handed yet again, losing in the big game 37-7.

Season 13

After being crushed in the previous season's Ultimini game, the Marshals rebounded with an excellent season. They won their first four games of the season, and they didn't lose a game from week 6 vs. the Palm Beach Solar Bears until week 12, where they lost to the Tijuana Luchadores by one point, 21-20. San Antonio had much success this season, thanks to an excellent offense, led by quarterback Zenyou Wozy, who threw for 2272 yards and 13 touchdowns, and running back Fast Boija, who had an excellent season 13, rushing for over 2500 yards and 19 touchdowns, both league records at the time, and one of them, the yards record, still stands today. The Marshals' offense averaged a league-best 23.4 points per game and 353.6 yards per game, while the defense gave up a league-best 13.8 points per game and 285.3 yards per game. The defense also proved they could put point on the board, scoring three defensive touchdowns, the second-most in the league. With regular season stats like these, it's no surprise that they finished at the top of the SFC South division at 11-3 on the season. Despite such an amazing regular season, the San Antonio Marshals once again found themselves the losers of the Conference championship game, this time losing to the Luchadores with an eerily similar score to the last season's finish, 37 to 10. The Luchadores would go on to win the Ultimini game against the Kansas City Coyotes, in overtime, with the final score being 30-27.

Season 14

After a second straight embarrassment by the Tijuana Luchadores in the two previous SFC South Conference Championship games, the San Antonio Marshals somehow improved on their record of 11-3 from the previous season, losing just one game, their week 8 matchup against the Portland Pythons, in Portland, including 4 preseason wins to start out the year. When you take a look at the season stats, this remarkable number is no surprise. The Marshals scored the most points of any team for the second season in a row, 28.4, and gave up fewer points than any other team for the second season in a row, 13.8. They also had the most yards in their conference and gave up the least yards in the league. New starting quarterback Cooter Bigsby threw the ball for 2276 yards and 18 touchdowns while running back Morgan Marshall had more than 1500 yards and 13 touchdowns. At the end of the regular season, the Marshals were once again looking at an SFC South Conference Championship game being played at home against the Tijuana Luchadores. After such a dominating regular season, where opponents scored more than 20 points against them just 3 times, the Luchadores put up 30, beating them 30-21 after the Marshals were unable to score a single point in what would be their last quarter of the 14th DSFL season. The Luchadores would go on to play the Ultimini game against the Portland Pythons, where they would end up losing 30-24 thanks to a late fourth-quarter touchdown.

Season 15

The San Antonio Marshals were unable to continue with the success of their previous seasons, Thanks to the drafting of many of their previous starters to new NSFL in the NSFL draft that season. The Marshals offense did much worse than they had in the previous season, scoring a measly 18.4 points per game, which is exactly 10 fewer points than they had scored in the previous season. Their defense also performed at a lower standard than they had previously, giving up more than 20 points per game, almost 10 more points per game than the last season. Despite these regressions, the San Antonio Marshals were able to win all four of their preseason games, but they were not able to continue with this success during the regular season. They lost each of their first 3 games, not winning until their week 4 matchup against the Tijuana Luchadores, and failed to win more than two games in a row the entire season. Quarterback Peter Larson threw the ball for 2005 yards and 6 touchdowns, and running back Bast Foija ran the ball for 1592 yards and 15 touchdowns. The Marshals finished the season at 5 wins, 8 losses, and 1 tie (their week 5 matchup vs. the Palm Beach Solar Bears). This record put San Antonio at the bottom of the SFC South Conference, behind the 9-5 Tijuana Luchadores and the 7-6-1 Palm Beach Solar Bears, meaning they did not make the playoffs for the first time since the 5th DSFL season, in 2020.

Season 16

The San Antonio Marshals were unable to continue with the success of their previous seasons, Thanks to the drafting of many of their previous starters to new NSFL in the NSFL draft that season. The Marshals offense did much worse than they had in the previous season, scoring a measly 18.4 points per game, which is exactly 10 fewer points than they had scored in the previous season. Their defense also performed at a lower standard than they had previously, giving up more than 20 points per game, almost 10 more points per game than the last season. Despite these regressions, the San Antonio Marshals were able to win all four of their preseason games, but they were not able to continue with this success during the regular season. They lost each of their first 3 games, not winning until their week 4 matchup against the Tijuana Luchadores, and failed to win more than two games in a row the entire season. Quarterback Peter Larson threw the ball for 2005 yards and 6 touchdowns, and running back Bast Foija ran the ball for 1592 yards and 15 touchdowns. The Marshals finished the season at 5 wins, 8 losses, and 1 tie (their week 5 matchup vs. the Palm Beach Solar Bears). This record put San Antonio at the bottom of the SFC South Conference, behind the 9-5 Tijuana Luchadores and the 7-6-1 Palm Beach Solar Bears, meaning they did not make the playoffs for the first time since the 5th DSFL season, in 2020.

Season 17

After missing the playoffs in season 16, the San Antonio Marshals rebounded in season 17. They started of hot, winning their first 3 games of the season before losing their week 4 matchup against the Kansas City Coyotes. San Antonio also finished their season with two wins in a row, which put them at a record of 8 wins, 5 losses, and 1 tie, (their week 6 game played against the Tijuana Luchadores), they were able to make the playoffs for another season. They accomplished this thanks to two factors. One was that they had the league's second best defense, which gave up less than 18 points per game and exactly 341 yards per game. The other was that they had the league's second best offense, scoring 25.4 points per game and averaging just less than 370 yards per game, led by quarterback Jim McMahon, who threw for 2188 yards and 12 touchdowns and rookie running back Ruff Ruff, who ran for 1438 yards and scored 24 touchdowns. The Marshals would play the Tijuana Luchadores in the SFC South Conference championship game for another time, again away in Tijuana. In this tight matchup, San Antonio took an early 3 point lead thanks to a field goal off the foot of Dave Anima, but it wouldn't last long thanks to a touchdown to end the 1st quarter. After to more touchdowns, one for each team, the score going into halftime would be 14-13, Tijuana leading. However, the Marshals couldn't find the end zone at all in the 2nd half and ended up losing to the Luchadores 24-16.

Season 18

The 18th DSFL season would be the last season for the San Antonio Marshals, as they would change their name and relocate to Minnesota, becoming the Minnesota Grey Ducks. In this final seasoning San Antonio, the Marshals would win all 4 of their preseason games before opening up the regular season with a loss against the Myrtle Beach Buccaneers. The number of points they scored and gave up per game were much closer in this season than in previous ones, the offense averaging 21.9 points per game and the defense giving up an average of 19.9 points per game. Rookie quarterback for the Marshals Zack Vega threw the ball for just under 2500 yards, at 2496, and 11 touchdowns, and running back Matthais Hanyadi ran for 1208 yards, and scored 8 touchdowns on the season. The Marshals finished their last regular season with a record of 6-8, a .429 win percentage, and they made the playoffs behind the Tijuana Luchadores once again, who had a record of 13 wins and only one loss. In their final matchup against Tijuana, in another SFC South Conference championship, the San Antonio Marshalls would finally triumph over the Luchadores, winning the game with a final score of 17-10, and earning them another trip to the Ultimini game and a chance at the title of league champions. San Antonio would play the Portland Pythons, and they opened the game up with an early touchdown to put them on the board. Unfortunately, the Marshals wouldn't be able to do much more scoring, losing their final game as a team 23-10.

Season 19

The Marshals received a makeover in the 19th DSFL season, becoming the Minnesota Grey Ducks, which they are still known as today. In addition to a relocation and a name change, the Grey Ducks also switched conferences, moving to the NFC North Conference. The Ducks did much better than they had in the last season, even though their offense wasn't particularly outstanding, thanks to a good defensive squad. The offense, led by quarterback Zack Vega, who threw the ball for 1713 yards and 7 touchdowns, and running back Darrel Williams, who ran the ball for 1713 yards and 11 touchdowns, scored an average of 18.1 points per game, 4th in the league. The Minnesota defense gave up 16.1 points per game, which was 1st in the conference, but 3rd in the league. They also gave up just less than 280 (279.5) yards per game, which was first in the league. The Grey Ducks finished the regular season with a record of 9-5, including a home record of 6-1. This put them in first in their conference and into their first playoff game under the new branding, the NFC North Conference championship game, against their conference rival, the 8-6 Portland Pythons. The Ducks would end up winning this very close game, thanks to a field goal off the foot of rookie kicker Silver Banana with 5 seconds left on the clock, putting them ahead 30-27 and sending them to the Ultimini and giving them a chance to win the Ultimini trophy. In they Ultimini they faced long-time rivals, the Tijuana Luchadores. After getting ahead 13-0 in this game, Minnesota let the Luchadores back in when they tied it in the third quarter at 13-13. Then, kicker Silver Banana came in clutch again and hit a 34-yard field goal to put them ahead, a lead that Tijuana would be unable to overcome, bringing the Ultimini trophy to Minnesota for the first time ever.

Season 20

After their previous taste of victory, the Minnesota Grey Ducks wanted more, and they showed it. They won all four of their preseason games and won their first two regular-season games. They had the league's best offense, scoring nearly 28 points per game, thanks to an amazing year by quarterback Zack Vega, who had 1840 yards through the air and 18 passing touchdowns on the season. Their newest running back, Baby Yoda, also helped out the cause, running for 1410 yards and scoring 7 times. The Ducks also had the league's second-best defense, which gave up just 13.3 points per game and allowed only 284.4 yards per game. These stats both would've been first nearly any other season, however, the Myrtle Beach Buccaneers had a stifling defense as well, giving up only 8.5 points per game, an amazingly low number. The Minnesota Grey Ducks would finish out the season with 6 straight wins, which put them at the top of the NFC North with 12 wins and 2 losses. In the NFC NORTH Conference championship game, the Grey Ducks played at home against the Kansas City Coyotes, who they absolutely crushed thanks to their stellar offense and defense, winning the game 36-7. They then had to face the Myrtle Beach Buccaneers, the league's defensive powerhouse. However, try way Minnesota played, you wouldn't have known that the Bucs defense was good, as they scored4 touchdowns and gave up only a field goal. The Minnesota Grey Ducks beat the Myrtle Beach Buccaneers 28-3 and won themselves a second consecutive DSFL championship.

Season 21

Season 21 saw the addition of two new teams to the league, one for each conference. This meant that Minnesota would have another opponent to beat when trying to make the playoffs, the London Royals. It seems these new additions to the league messed with the heads of the Minnesota players, because they had the league's worst offense, scoring only 15.9 points per game. The Grey Ducks defense gave up almost 10 points more per game on average, at 20.8 points per game, the 5th best in the league. Quarterback Zack Vega had a very underwhelming season, and he threw for just 863 yards and 2 touchdowns, while running back Baby Yoda did slightly better, racking up just 959 yards on the ground and scoring only 3 touchdowns on the season. Wide Receiver William Alexander, the Grey Ducks leading receiver, had 41 receptions for 502 yards, and caught just one touchdown pass the entire season. With these lackluster numbers, it's no surprise that the Grey Ducks had a much worse season than the last one, finishing with a record of 6 wins and 8 losses, including one stretch where they lost 5 games in a row. Minnesota finished the season in 3rd in the NFC North conference, in front of only the new expansion team, the London Royals, who had a record of 5 wins and 9 losses. After winning the Ultimus 2 seasons in a row, the Ducks just fell right off the map and failed to make it to the playoffs at all.

Season 22

After failing to make it to the playoffs in the previous season, the Minnesota Brey Ducks looked to get back into fighting form for the 22nd DSFL season, and they definitely did much better than they did in season 21. New starting quarterback Sim SnowBow threw for more than 2500 yards and had 18 passing touchdowns, and running back Jamar Lackson had 320 carries for 1410 yards, crossing the plane a total of 9 times. They had the league's second-best offense, which scored 22.6 points per game, as well as the league's best defense, which gave up only 15.4 points per game. Even though they had a record of just 8-6, the Grey Ducks led their division for almost all of the season and finished it in first place, ahead of the 6-8 London Royals, the new expansion team, the 5-9 Portland Pythons, and the 5-9 Kansas City Coyotes. Minnesota would play the London Royals in the Royals' first playoff game since becoming a team, and Minnesota would lose to the Royals and their first playoff game since becoming a team. It was a very low scoring affair, and it needed more than regulation time to finish. In the end, the Royals would take the game thanks to an overtime field goal off the foot of kicker Datsum Phastbawl to put them ahead 13-10. The Royals would go on to lose in the Ultimini game in Tijuana to the Tijuana Luchadores in an even more low scoring game, the final score being 10-6 Luchadores.

Season 23

Following the Template:Dfsly season the Minnesota Grey Ducks were looking to continue on the trend of making the playoffs. They were led by Quarterback SnowBow, who was looking to follow up on his impressive last season. However, they were not able to get the start they were hoping to get, dropping their first game on the season to Norfolk Seawolves 24-6. This was not even a competitive game, as they were not able to surmount any type of offensive assault. They were able to bounce back with some nice wins, before going on a losing streak of 5 games. The season continued on like this with ups and down, but bigger losing streaks then winning. They ended the regular season strongly with impressive wins against, Portland Pythons,{tf|KCC}}, andISFL. They were unable to make the playoffs posting a 6-8 record and a .429 winning percentage. SnowBow had a decent season throwing for 2169 yards and 13 touchdowns. They were led on the ground by Keppler, running for close to 1281 yard and 10 touchdowns. The winning streak to end the season should give Minnesota Grey Ducks hope going into next season.

Logos and uniforms

Current roster

{{DSFL roster |TeamName=Minnesota Grey Ducks |BC1=#19ADE4 |FC1=#000000 |BDC1=#FFFFFF

|Active=25

|Date= Sept 15th, 2021

|Quarterbacks=

|Running Backs=

|Wide Receivers=

|Tight Ends=

|Offensive Linemen=

|Howard Walters}

]]


Season-by-season records

Season Regular Season Record Post Season Record
W L T PCT W L
2018 9 5 0 .643 2 0
2019 7 7 0 .500 1 1
2020 6 8 0 .429 0 0
2021 7 6 0 .536 2 0
2022 5 9 0 .357 0 1
2023 11 3 0 .786 0 1
2024 5 8 1 .607 0 1
2025 9 5 0 .643 0 1
2026 9 5 0 .643 0 1
2027 5 9 0 .357 1 1
2028 11 3 0 .786 0 1
2029 13 1 0 .929 0 1
2030 5 8 1 .393 0 0
2031 7 7 0 .500 0 1
2032 8 5 1 .607 0 1
2033 6 8 0 .429 1 1
2034 9 5 0 .643 2 0
2035 12 2 0 .857 2 0
2036 6 8 0 .429 0 0
2037 8 6 0 .571 0 1
2038 6 8 0 .429 0 0
2039 5 9 0 .357 0 0
2040 8 6 0 .571 0 0
2041 7 7 0 .500 0 0
2042 6 8 0 .429 0 0
2043 7 7 0 .500 0 0
2044 10 4 0 .625 2 0
Total 210 164 4 .530 13 13

References


Template:San Antonio Marshals